Vitamin World

Vitamin E Cream 6000 IU

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Vitamin E Cream 6000 IU

Vitamin World

Vitamin E Cream 6000 IU

2 oz. Cream / 6000 IU / Item# 000610
Buy 1, Get 1 Free
Add 2 items into the cart
Details
Add 2 items into the cart to receive the discount.

  • $7.99
    Price per oz. : $4.00

    In Stock

  • DESCRIPTION +
    This Vitamin E Cream exclusive formula pampers you with a wealth of natural moisturizers and emollients... and leaves absolutely no oily film on the skin. Nourishes Dry Skin and Fragrance Free.
  • LABEL INFORMATION +
    Directions: Apply 2-3 times daily as a moisturizer, make-up base, or night cream. Especially useful to correct the drying effects of sun, wind and weather.

    Other Ingredients: Purified Water, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Petrolatum, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Cetearyl Alcohol and Ceteareth-20, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetyl Esters, Stearic Acid, Mineral Oil, Phenoxyethanol (and) Ethyhexyl-glycerine, Triethanolamine, Sodium Magnesium Silicate, Polysorbate 80, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil.

  • RATINGS & REVIEWS +
  • HEALTH NOTES +

    Disclaimer

    The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

    Nutritional Supplement

    Vitamin E

    This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
    • Heart and Circulatory Health

      Intermittent Claudication

      Taking vitamin E may improve blood flow and increase walking capacity.
      Intermittent Claudication
      ×
       

      Vitamin E supplementation has been shown in controlled trials to increase both walking distance and blood flow through arteries of the lower legs in people with intermittent claudication.1,2 Increasing dietary intake of vitamin E was also associated with better blood flow to the legs.3 Some early studies did not find vitamin E useful. Possibly this failure was due to the short duration of the studies,4 as one review article suggested that a minimum of four to six months of vitamin E supplementation may be necessary before significant improvement is seen.5 Most clinical trials of vitamin E and intermittent claudication used 400 to 600 IU per day, although one study used 2,400 IU per day.

      Anemia

      Supplementing with vitamin E may improve anemia in cases of vitamin E deficiency.
      Anemia
      ×
       

      Hemolytic anemia refers to a category of anemia in which red blood cells become fragile and undergo premature death. Vitamin E deficiency, though quite rare, can cause hemolytic anemia because vitamin E protects the red blood cell membrane from oxidative damage. Vitamin E deficiency anemia usually affects only premature infants and children with cystic fibrosis.6,7 Preliminary studies have reported that large amounts (typically 800 IU per day) of vitamin E improve hemolytic anemia caused by a genetic deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)8,9,10 and anemia caused by kidney dialysis.11,12

    • Skin Protection

      Sunburn

      Antioxidants may protect the skin from sunburn due to free radical–producing ultraviolet rays. Combinations of vitamin E and C offer protection against ultraviolet rays.
      Sunburn
      ×

      Antioxidants may protect the skin from sunburn due to free radical–producing ultraviolet rays.13 Combinations of 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day of vitamin E and 2,000 to 3,000 mg per day of vitamin C, but neither given alone, have a significant protective effect against ultraviolet rays, according to double-blind studies.14,15,16

      Oral synthetic beta-carotene alone was not found to provide effective protection when given in amounts of 15 mg per day or for only a few weeks’ time in larger amounts of 60 to 90 mg per day, but it has been effective either in very large (180 mg per day) amounts or in smaller amounts (30 mg per day) in combination with topical sunscreen.17,18,19,20,21

      Natural sources of beta-carotene or other carotenoids have been more consistently shown to protect against sunburn. One controlled study found that taking a supplement of natural carotenoids (almost all of which was beta-carotene) in daily amounts of 30 mg, 60 mg, and 90 mg gave progressively more protection against ultraviolet rays.22 In another controlled study, either 24 mg per day of natural beta-carotene or 24 mg per day of a carotenoid combination of equal amounts beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene helped protect skin from ultraviolet rays.23 A preliminary study compared synthetic lycopene (10.1 mg per day), a natural tomato extract containing 9.8 mg of lycopene per day plus additional amounts of other carotenoids, and a solubilized tomato drink (designed to increase lycopene absorption) containing 8.2 mg of lycopene plus additional amounts of other carotenoids. After 12 weeks, only the two tomato-based products were shown to give significant protection against burning by ultraviolet light.24

      Still other trials have tested combinations of several antioxidants. One preliminary study found that a daily combination of beta-carotene (6 mg), lycopene (6 mg), vitamin E (15 IU), and selenium for seven weeks protected against ultraviolet light.25 However, a double-blind trial of a combination of smaller amounts of several carotenoids, vitamins C and E, selenium, and proanthocyanidins did not find significant UV protection compared with placebo.26 Similarly, in a controlled trial, a combination of selenium, copper, and vitamins was found to be ineffective.27

      It should be noted that while oral protection from sunburn has been demonstrated with several types of antioxidants, the degree of protection (typically less than an SPF of 2) is much less than that provided by currently available topical sunscreens. On the other hand, these modest effects will provide some added protection to skin areas where sunscreen is also used and will give a small amount of protection to sun-exposed areas where sunscreen is not applied. However, oral protection from sunburn is not instantaneous; maximum effects are not reached until these antioxidants have been used for about eight to ten weeks.28,29

    • Immune System Support

      Immune Function

      Vitamin E enhances some measures of immune-cell activity in the elderly.
      Immune Function
      ×

      Most,30,31 but not all,32 double-blind studies have shown that elderly people have better immune function and reduced infection rates when taking a multiple vitamin-mineral formula. In one double-blind trial, supplements of 100 mcg per day of selenium and 20 mg per day of zinc, with or without additional vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene, reduced infections in elderly people, though vitamins without minerals had no effect.33 Burn victims have also experienced fewer infections after receiving trace mineral supplements in double-blind research.34 These studies suggest that trace minerals may be the most important micronutrients for enhancing immunity and preventing infections in the elderly.

    • Joint Health

      Rheumatoid Arthritis

      Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, protecting joints against oxidative damage. Supplementing with vitamin E can help ease symptoms, including pain.
      Rheumatoid Arthritis
      ×
       

      People with RA have been reported to have an impaired antioxidant system, making them more susceptible to free radical damage.35Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, protecting many tissues, including joints, against oxidative damage. Low vitamin E levels in the joint fluid of people with RA have been reported.36 In a double-blind trial, approximately 1,800 IU per day of vitamin E was found to reduce pain from RA.37 Two other double-blind trials (using similar high levels of vitamin E) reported that vitamin E had approximately the same effectiveness in reducing symptoms of RA as anti-inflammatory drugs.38,39 In other double-blind trials, 600 IU of vitamin E taken twice daily was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing RA, although laboratory measures of inflammation remained unchanged.40,41

    What Are Star Ratings?
    ×
    Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
    Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
    For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    Temp Title
    ×
    Temp Text

    Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cell membranes and other fat-soluble parts of the body, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL; “bad” cholesterol) cholesterol, from damage.

    References

    1. Haeger K. Long-time treatment of intermittent claudication with vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr 1974;27:1179-81.

    2. Williams HT, Fenna D, Macbeth RA. Alpha tocopherol in the treatment of intermittent claudication. Surg Gynecol Obstet 1971;Apr:662-6.

    3. Donnan PT, Thomson M, Fowkes GR, et al. Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population: the Edinburgh Artery Study. Am J Clin Nutr 1993;57:917-21.

    4. Livingstone PD, Jones C. Treatment of intermittent claudication with vitamin E. Lancet 1958;ii:602-4 [review].

    5. Piesse JW. Vitamin E and peripheral vascular disease. Int Clin Nutr Rev 1984;4:178-82 [review].

    6. Mino M. Clinical uses and abuses of vitamin E in children. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1992;200:266-70 [review].

    7. Swann IL, Kendra JR. Anaemia, vitamin E deficiency and failure to thrive in an infant. Clin Lab Haematol 1998;20:61-3.

    8. Hafez M, Amar ES, Zedan M, et al. Improved erythrocyte survival with combined vitamin E and selenium therapy in children with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and mild chronic hemolysis. J Pediatr 1986;108:558-61.

    9. Corash L, Spielberg S, Bartsocas C, et al. Reduced chronic hemolysis during high-dose vitamin E administration in Mediterranean-type glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. N Engl J Med 1980;303:416-20.

    10. Eldamhougy S, Elhelw Z, Yamamah G, et al. The vitamin E status among glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients and effectiveness of oral vitamin E. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1988;58:184-8.

    11. Ono K. Reduction of osmotic haemolysis and anaemia by high dose vitamin E supplementation in regular haemodialysis patients. Proc Eur Dial Transplant Assoc Eur Ren Assoc 1985;21:296-9.

    12. Ono K. Effects of large dose vitamin E supplementation on anemia in hemodialysis patients. Nephron 1985;40:440-5.

    13. Fuchs J. Potentials and limitations of the natural antioxidants RRR-alpha-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid and beta-carotene in cutaneous photoprotection. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:848-73 [review].

    14. Werninghaus K, Meydani M, Bhawan J, et al. Evaluation of the photoprotective effect of oral vitamin E supplementation. Arch Dermatol 1994;130:1257-61.

    15. Fuchs J, Kern H. Modulation of UV-light-induced skin inflammation by D-alpha-tocopherol and L-ascorbic acid: a clinical study using solar simulated radiation. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:1006-12.

    16. Eberlein-Konig B, Placzek M, Przybilla B. Protective effect against sunburn of combined systemic ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and d-alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). J Am Acad Dermatol 1998;38:45-8.

    17. McArdle F, Rhodes LE, Parslew RA, et al. Effects of oral vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress in human skin. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;80:1270-5.

    18. Garmyn M, Ribaya-Mercado JD, Russel RM, et al. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on the human sunburn reaction. Exp Dermatol 1995;4:104-11.

    19. Wolf C, Steiner A, Honigsmann H, et al. Do oral carotenoids protect human skin against UV erythema, psoralen phototoxicity, and UV-induced DNA damage? J Invest Dermatol 1988;90:55-57.

    20. Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Parrish J, et al. A clinical trial of the effects of oral beta-carotene on the responses of human skin to solar radiation. J Invest Dermatol 1972;59:349-53.

    21. Gollnick HP, Hopfenmuller W, Hemmes C, et al. Systemic B-carotene plus topical sunscreen are an optimal protection against harmful effects of natural UV-sunlight. Eur J Dermatol 1996;6:200-5.

    22. Lee J, Jiang S, Levine N, Watson RR. Carotenoid supplementation reduces erythema in human skin after simulated solar radiation exposure. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 2000;223:170-4.

    23. Heinrich U, Gartner C, Wiebusch M, et al. Supplementation with beta-carotene or a similar amount of mixed carotenoids protects humans from UV-induced erythema. J Nutr 2003;133:98-101.

    24. Aust O, Stahl W, Sies H, et al. Supplementation with tomato-based products increases lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene levels in human serum and protects against UV-light-induced erythema. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2005;75:54-60.

    25. Cesarini JP, Michel L, Maurette JM, et al. Immediate effects of UV radiation on the skin: modification by an antioxidant complex containing carotenoids. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2003;19:182-9.

    26. Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, et al. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol 2002;15:307-15.

    27. La Ruche G, Cesarini JP. Protective effect of oral selenium plus copper associated with vitamin complex on sunburn cell formation in human skin. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 1991;8:232-5.

    28. Sies H, Stahl W. Nutritional protection against skin damage from sunlight. Annu Rev Nutr 2004;24:173-200 [review].

    29. Sies H, Stahl W. Carotenoids and UV protection. Photochem Photobiol Sci 2004;3:749-52 [review].

    30. Pike J, Chandra RK. Effect of vitamin and trace element supplementation on immune indices in healthy elderly. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1995;65:117-21.

    31. Chandra RK. Effect of vitamin and trace-element supplementation on immune responses and infection in elderly subjects. Lancet 1992;340:1124-7.

    32. Chavance M, Herbeth B, Lemoine A, et al. Does multivitamin supplementation prevent infections in healthy elderly subjects? A controlled trial.Int.J Vitam Nutr Res 1993;63:11-6.

    33. Girodon F, Lombard M, Galan P, et al. Effect of micronutrient supplementation on infection in institutionalized elderly subjects: a controlled trial. Ann Nutr Metab 1997;41:98-107.

    34. Berger MM, Spertini F, Shenkin A, et al. Trace element supplementation modulates pulmonary infection rates after major burns: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68:365-71.

    35. Ozturk HS, Cimen MY, Cimen OB, et al. Oxidant/antioxidant status of plasma samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatol Int 1999;19:35-7.

    36. Fairburn K, Grootveld M, Ward RJ, et al. Alpha-tocopherol, lipids and lipoproteins in knee-joint synovial fluid and serum from patients with inflammatory joint disease. Clin Sci 1992;83:657-64.

    37. Scherak O, Kolarz G. Vitamin E and rheumatoid arthritis. Arthrit Rheum 1991;34:1205-6 [letter].

    38. Wittenborg A, Petersen G, Lorkowski G, Brabant T. Effectiveness of vitamin E in comparison with diclofenac sodium in treatment of patients with chronic polyarthritis. Z Rheumatol 1998;57:215-21 [in German].

    39. Kolarz G, Scherak O, El Shohoumi M, Blankenhorn G. High dose vitamin E for chronic arthritis. Akt Rheumatol 1990;15:233-7 [in German].

    40. Edmonds SE, Winyard PG, Guo R, et al. Putative analgesic activity of repeated oral doses of vitamin E in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a prospective placebo controlled double-blind trial. Ann Rheum Dis 1997;56:649-55.

    41. Miehle W. Vitamin E in active arthroses and chronic polyarthritis. What is the value of alpha-tocopherol in therapy? Fortschr Med 1997;115:39-42.

    Copyright © 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

    The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.

Images

Vitamin E Cream 6000 IU

Vitamin World

Vitamin E Cream 6000 IU

2 oz. Cream / 6000 IU / Item# 000610
Buy 1, Get 1 Free
Add 2 items into the cart
Details
Add 2 items into the cart to receive the discount.

  • $7.99
    Price per oz. : $4.00

    In Stock

Additional Information

This Vitamin E Cream exclusive formula pampers you with a wealth of natural moisturizers and emollients... and leaves absolutely no oily film on the skin. Nourishes Dry Skin and Fragrance Free.
Directions: Apply 2-3 times daily as a moisturizer, make-up base, or night cream. Especially useful to correct the drying effects of sun, wind and weather.

Other Ingredients: Purified Water, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Petrolatum, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Cetearyl Alcohol and Ceteareth-20, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetyl Esters, Stearic Acid, Mineral Oil, Phenoxyethanol (and) Ethyhexyl-glycerine, Triethanolamine, Sodium Magnesium Silicate, Polysorbate 80, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil.

Disclaimer

The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

Nutritional Supplement

Vitamin E

This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Heart and Circulatory Health

    Intermittent Claudication

    Taking vitamin E may improve blood flow and increase walking capacity.
    Intermittent Claudication
    ×
     

    Vitamin E supplementation has been shown in controlled trials to increase both walking distance and blood flow through arteries of the lower legs in people with intermittent claudication.1,2 Increasing dietary intake of vitamin E was also associated with better blood flow to the legs.3 Some early studies did not find vitamin E useful. Possibly this failure was due to the short duration of the studies,4 as one review article suggested that a minimum of four to six months of vitamin E supplementation may be necessary before significant improvement is seen.5 Most clinical trials of vitamin E and intermittent claudication used 400 to 600 IU per day, although one study used 2,400 IU per day.

    Anemia

    Supplementing with vitamin E may improve anemia in cases of vitamin E deficiency.
    Anemia
    ×
     

    Hemolytic anemia refers to a category of anemia in which red blood cells become fragile and undergo premature death. Vitamin E deficiency, though quite rare, can cause hemolytic anemia because vitamin E protects the red blood cell membrane from oxidative damage. Vitamin E deficiency anemia usually affects only premature infants and children with cystic fibrosis.6,7 Preliminary studies have reported that large amounts (typically 800 IU per day) of vitamin E improve hemolytic anemia caused by a genetic deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)8,9,10 and anemia caused by kidney dialysis.11,12

  • Skin Protection

    Sunburn

    Antioxidants may protect the skin from sunburn due to free radical–producing ultraviolet rays. Combinations of vitamin E and C offer protection against ultraviolet rays.
    Sunburn
    ×

    Antioxidants may protect the skin from sunburn due to free radical–producing ultraviolet rays.13 Combinations of 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day of vitamin E and 2,000 to 3,000 mg per day of vitamin C, but neither given alone, have a significant protective effect against ultraviolet rays, according to double-blind studies.14,15,16

    Oral synthetic beta-carotene alone was not found to provide effective protection when given in amounts of 15 mg per day or for only a few weeks’ time in larger amounts of 60 to 90 mg per day, but it has been effective either in very large (180 mg per day) amounts or in smaller amounts (30 mg per day) in combination with topical sunscreen.17,18,19,20,21

    Natural sources of beta-carotene or other carotenoids have been more consistently shown to protect against sunburn. One controlled study found that taking a supplement of natural carotenoids (almost all of which was beta-carotene) in daily amounts of 30 mg, 60 mg, and 90 mg gave progressively more protection against ultraviolet rays.22 In another controlled study, either 24 mg per day of natural beta-carotene or 24 mg per day of a carotenoid combination of equal amounts beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene helped protect skin from ultraviolet rays.23 A preliminary study compared synthetic lycopene (10.1 mg per day), a natural tomato extract containing 9.8 mg of lycopene per day plus additional amounts of other carotenoids, and a solubilized tomato drink (designed to increase lycopene absorption) containing 8.2 mg of lycopene plus additional amounts of other carotenoids. After 12 weeks, only the two tomato-based products were shown to give significant protection against burning by ultraviolet light.24

    Still other trials have tested combinations of several antioxidants. One preliminary study found that a daily combination of beta-carotene (6 mg), lycopene (6 mg), vitamin E (15 IU), and selenium for seven weeks protected against ultraviolet light.25 However, a double-blind trial of a combination of smaller amounts of several carotenoids, vitamins C and E, selenium, and proanthocyanidins did not find significant UV protection compared with placebo.26 Similarly, in a controlled trial, a combination of selenium, copper, and vitamins was found to be ineffective.27

    It should be noted that while oral protection from sunburn has been demonstrated with several types of antioxidants, the degree of protection (typically less than an SPF of 2) is much less than that provided by currently available topical sunscreens. On the other hand, these modest effects will provide some added protection to skin areas where sunscreen is also used and will give a small amount of protection to sun-exposed areas where sunscreen is not applied. However, oral protection from sunburn is not instantaneous; maximum effects are not reached until these antioxidants have been used for about eight to ten weeks.28,29

  • Immune System Support

    Immune Function

    Vitamin E enhances some measures of immune-cell activity in the elderly.
    Immune Function
    ×

    Most,30,31 but not all,32 double-blind studies have shown that elderly people have better immune function and reduced infection rates when taking a multiple vitamin-mineral formula. In one double-blind trial, supplements of 100 mcg per day of selenium and 20 mg per day of zinc, with or without additional vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene, reduced infections in elderly people, though vitamins without minerals had no effect.33 Burn victims have also experienced fewer infections after receiving trace mineral supplements in double-blind research.34 These studies suggest that trace minerals may be the most important micronutrients for enhancing immunity and preventing infections in the elderly.

  • Joint Health

    Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, protecting joints against oxidative damage. Supplementing with vitamin E can help ease symptoms, including pain.
    Rheumatoid Arthritis
    ×
     

    People with RA have been reported to have an impaired antioxidant system, making them more susceptible to free radical damage.35Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, protecting many tissues, including joints, against oxidative damage. Low vitamin E levels in the joint fluid of people with RA have been reported.36 In a double-blind trial, approximately 1,800 IU per day of vitamin E was found to reduce pain from RA.37 Two other double-blind trials (using similar high levels of vitamin E) reported that vitamin E had approximately the same effectiveness in reducing symptoms of RA as anti-inflammatory drugs.38,39 In other double-blind trials, 600 IU of vitamin E taken twice daily was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing RA, although laboratory measures of inflammation remained unchanged.40,41

What Are Star Ratings?
×
Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

Temp Title
×
Temp Text

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cell membranes and other fat-soluble parts of the body, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL; “bad” cholesterol) cholesterol, from damage.

References

1. Haeger K. Long-time treatment of intermittent claudication with vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr 1974;27:1179-81.

2. Williams HT, Fenna D, Macbeth RA. Alpha tocopherol in the treatment of intermittent claudication. Surg Gynecol Obstet 1971;Apr:662-6.

3. Donnan PT, Thomson M, Fowkes GR, et al. Diet as a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease in the general population: the Edinburgh Artery Study. Am J Clin Nutr 1993;57:917-21.

4. Livingstone PD, Jones C. Treatment of intermittent claudication with vitamin E. Lancet 1958;ii:602-4 [review].

5. Piesse JW. Vitamin E and peripheral vascular disease. Int Clin Nutr Rev 1984;4:178-82 [review].

6. Mino M. Clinical uses and abuses of vitamin E in children. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1992;200:266-70 [review].

7. Swann IL, Kendra JR. Anaemia, vitamin E deficiency and failure to thrive in an infant. Clin Lab Haematol 1998;20:61-3.

8. Hafez M, Amar ES, Zedan M, et al. Improved erythrocyte survival with combined vitamin E and selenium therapy in children with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and mild chronic hemolysis. J Pediatr 1986;108:558-61.

9. Corash L, Spielberg S, Bartsocas C, et al. Reduced chronic hemolysis during high-dose vitamin E administration in Mediterranean-type glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. N Engl J Med 1980;303:416-20.

10. Eldamhougy S, Elhelw Z, Yamamah G, et al. The vitamin E status among glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients and effectiveness of oral vitamin E. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1988;58:184-8.

11. Ono K. Reduction of osmotic haemolysis and anaemia by high dose vitamin E supplementation in regular haemodialysis patients. Proc Eur Dial Transplant Assoc Eur Ren Assoc 1985;21:296-9.

12. Ono K. Effects of large dose vitamin E supplementation on anemia in hemodialysis patients. Nephron 1985;40:440-5.

13. Fuchs J. Potentials and limitations of the natural antioxidants RRR-alpha-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid and beta-carotene in cutaneous photoprotection. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:848-73 [review].

14. Werninghaus K, Meydani M, Bhawan J, et al. Evaluation of the photoprotective effect of oral vitamin E supplementation. Arch Dermatol 1994;130:1257-61.

15. Fuchs J, Kern H. Modulation of UV-light-induced skin inflammation by D-alpha-tocopherol and L-ascorbic acid: a clinical study using solar simulated radiation. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:1006-12.

16. Eberlein-Konig B, Placzek M, Przybilla B. Protective effect against sunburn of combined systemic ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and d-alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). J Am Acad Dermatol 1998;38:45-8.

17. McArdle F, Rhodes LE, Parslew RA, et al. Effects of oral vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress in human skin. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;80:1270-5.

18. Garmyn M, Ribaya-Mercado JD, Russel RM, et al. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on the human sunburn reaction. Exp Dermatol 1995;4:104-11.

19. Wolf C, Steiner A, Honigsmann H, et al. Do oral carotenoids protect human skin against UV erythema, psoralen phototoxicity, and UV-induced DNA damage? J Invest Dermatol 1988;90:55-57.

20. Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Parrish J, et al. A clinical trial of the effects of oral beta-carotene on the responses of human skin to solar radiation. J Invest Dermatol 1972;59:349-53.

21. Gollnick HP, Hopfenmuller W, Hemmes C, et al. Systemic B-carotene plus topical sunscreen are an optimal protection against harmful effects of natural UV-sunlight. Eur J Dermatol 1996;6:200-5.

22. Lee J, Jiang S, Levine N, Watson RR. Carotenoid supplementation reduces erythema in human skin after simulated solar radiation exposure. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 2000;223:170-4.

23. Heinrich U, Gartner C, Wiebusch M, et al. Supplementation with beta-carotene or a similar amount of mixed carotenoids protects humans from UV-induced erythema. J Nutr 2003;133:98-101.

24. Aust O, Stahl W, Sies H, et al. Supplementation with tomato-based products increases lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene levels in human serum and protects against UV-light-induced erythema. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2005;75:54-60.

25. Cesarini JP, Michel L, Maurette JM, et al. Immediate effects of UV radiation on the skin: modification by an antioxidant complex containing carotenoids. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2003;19:182-9.

26. Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, et al. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol 2002;15:307-15.

27. La Ruche G, Cesarini JP. Protective effect of oral selenium plus copper associated with vitamin complex on sunburn cell formation in human skin. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 1991;8:232-5.

28. Sies H, Stahl W. Nutritional protection against skin damage from sunlight. Annu Rev Nutr 2004;24:173-200 [review].

29. Sies H, Stahl W. Carotenoids and UV protection. Photochem Photobiol Sci 2004;3:749-52 [review].

30. Pike J, Chandra RK. Effect of vitamin and trace element supplementation on immune indices in healthy elderly. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1995;65:117-21.

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The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.