Vitamin World

Neuro-PS®  Gold

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Neuro-PS®  Gold

Vitamin World

Neuro-PS®  Gold

90 Softgels / Item# 017148
Buy 1, Get 1 Free
Add 2 items into the cart
Details
Add 2 items into the cart to receive the discount.

  • $79.49

    In Stock

  • DESCRIPTION +
    Don’t worry if you can’t remember what the “PS” in Neuro-PS® stands for. 

    And no, it does not mean “Postscript” as in “let me add something” – though Neuro-PS® is something you may want to add to your daily nutritional supplement routine. 

    In this case, PS stands for Phosphatidylserine, a word everybody has trouble trying to remember, which is why we abbreviate it.  PS is a phospholipid, a natural substance found in brain cell membranes. It plays a role in neurotransmission, the transportation of nerve impulses across the synapses of the brain. These transmissions are essential to proper brain function, including mental cognition, memory and focus. 

    Unfortunately, PS levels decline as a person ages, making supplementation a key way to support brain health.** Taking it might even help you remember what the “PS” stands for!** Especially because this special formula also includes Ginkgo Biloba – an herb that has been studied for its ability to support proper blood flow to the body’s extremities, especially the brain – as well as amino acids, the Ayurbedic herb Gotu Kola, and other nutrients.**
  • LABEL INFORMATION +

    Supplement Facts

    Serving Size 3 Softgels
    Servings Per Container 30
    Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
    Calories 25
    Calories from Fat 15
    Total Fat2 g 3%**
    Total Carbohydrate<1 g <1%**
    Protein<1 g 2%**
    Neuro-PS® Gold™ Complex1,660.1 mg(1.66g) ***
      (Neuro-PS®) 1,500 mg (1.5g) ***
      (Phospholipid Complex from Soy (Lecithin)
      (Standardized to contain 20% (Phosphatidylserine, 300 mg) ***
      (DHA (from 44.7 mg Fish Oil) 10 mg ***
      (Ginkgo Biloba Extract (Ginkgo biloba) (leaf) 120 mg ***
      (Standardized to contain 24% Ginkgo (Flavone Glycosides, 28.8 mg) ***
      (Acetyl L-Carnitine Hydrochloride 10 mg ***
      (Gotu Kola Extract 6:1 10 mg ***
      (Centella asiatica) (leaf)
      (Choline Bitartrate 10 mg ***
      (Vinpocetine 100 mcg ***)
    **Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
    ***Daily Value not established.
    Directions: For adults, take three (3)softgels daily, preferably with a meal.

    Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Vegetable Glycerin, Soybean Oil, Natural Caramel Color. Contains soy and fish (tuna)ingredients.

    WARNING: If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications, including blood thinners, planning any medical or surgical procedure or have any medical condition, consult your doctor before use. Discontinue use and consult your doctor if any adverse reactions occur. Not intended for use by persons under the age of 18. Keep out of reach of children. Store at room temperature. Do not use if seal under cap is broken or missing.
  • RATINGS & REVIEWS +
  • HEALTH NOTES +

    Disclaimer

    The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

    Nutritional Supplement

    Phosphatidylserine

    This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
    • Healthy Aging/Senior Health

      Age-Related Cognitive Decline

      Bovine-derived PS (phosphatidylserine) has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly. To date, most evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not effective for ARCD.
      Age-Related Cognitive Decline
      ×
       

      Phosphatidylserine (PS) derived from bovine brain phospholipids has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly in at least two placebo-controlled trials. In both trials, geriatric patients received 300 mg per day of PS or placebo. In an unblinded trial of ten elderly women with depressive disorders, supplementation with PS produced consistent improvement in depressive symptoms, memory, and behavior after 30 days of treatment.1 A double-blind trial of 494 geriatric patients with cognitive impairment found that 300 mg per day of PS produced significant improvements in behavioral and cognitive parameters after three months and again after six months.2

      Most research has been conducted with PS derived from bovine tissue, but what is available commercially is made from soy. The soy- and bovine-derived PS, however, are not structurally identical.3 Doctors and researchers have debated whether the structural differences could be important,4,5 but so far only a few trials have studied the effects of soy-based PS.

      Preliminary animal research shows that the soy-derived PS does have effects on brain function similar to effects from the bovine source.6,3,8 An isolated, unpublished double-blind human study used soy-derived PS in an evaluation of memory and mood benefits in nondemented, nondepressed elderly people with impaired memories and accompanying depression.9 In this three-month study, 300 mg per day of PS was not significantly more effective than a placebo. In a double-blind study, soy-derived PS was administered in the amount of 300 or 600 mg per day for 12 weeks to people with age-related memory impairment. Compared with the placebo, soy-derived PS had no effect on memory or on other measures of cognitive function.10 While additional research needs to be done, currently available evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not an effective treatment for age-related cognitive decline.

    • Brain Health

      Age-Related Cognitive Decline

      Bovine-derived PS (phosphatidylserine) has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly. To date, most evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not effective for ARCD.
      Age-Related Cognitive Decline
      ×
       

      Phosphatidylserine (PS) derived from bovine brain phospholipids has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly in at least two placebo-controlled trials. In both trials, geriatric patients received 300 mg per day of PS or placebo. In an unblinded trial of ten elderly women with depressive disorders, supplementation with PS produced consistent improvement in depressive symptoms, memory, and behavior after 30 days of treatment.10 A double-blind trial of 494 geriatric patients with cognitive impairment found that 300 mg per day of PS produced significant improvements in behavioral and cognitive parameters after three months and again after six months.11

      Most research has been conducted with PS derived from bovine tissue, but what is available commercially is made from soy. The soy- and bovine-derived PS, however, are not structurally identical.12 Doctors and researchers have debated whether the structural differences could be important,13,14 but so far only a few trials have studied the effects of soy-based PS.

      Preliminary animal research shows that the soy-derived PS does have effects on brain function similar to effects from the bovine source.15,12,17 An isolated, unpublished double-blind human study used soy-derived PS in an evaluation of memory and mood benefits in nondemented, nondepressed elderly people with impaired memories and accompanying depression.18 In this three-month study, 300 mg per day of PS was not significantly more effective than a placebo. In a double-blind study, soy-derived PS was administered in the amount of 300 or 600 mg per day for 12 weeks to people with age-related memory impairment. Compared with the placebo, soy-derived PS had no effect on memory or on other measures of cognitive function.19 While additional research needs to be done, currently available evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not an effective treatment for age-related cognitive decline.

    What Are Star Ratings?
    ×
    Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
    Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
    For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    Temp Title
    ×
    Temp Text

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) belongs to a special category of fat-soluble substances called phospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes. PS is found in high concentrations in the brain.

    References

    1. Maggioni M, Picotti GB, Bondiolotti GP, et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine therapy in geriatric patients with depressive disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1990;81(3):265-70.

    2. Cenacchi T, Bertoldin T, Farina C, et al. Cognitive decline in the elderly: a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study on efficacy of phosphatidylserine administration. Aging (Milano) 1993;5(2):123-33.

    3. Sakai M, Yamatoya H, Kudo S. Pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine enzymatically synthesized from soybean lecithin on brain functions in rodents. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1996;42:47-54.

    4. Kidd PM. Don't believe everything you read. . .a sequel. Point. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:122-4 [editorial].

    5. Gaby AR. Don't believe everything you read. CounterPoint. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:125-6 [editorial].

    6. Furushiro M, Suzuki S, Shishido Y, et al. Effects of oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on impaired learning of passive avoidance in mice. Jpn J Pharmacol 1997;75:447-50.

    7. Blokland A, Honig W, Brouns F, et al. Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutrition 1999;15:778-83.

    8. Gindin J, Novikov M, Kedar D, et al. The effect of plant phosphatidylserine on age-associated memory impairment and mood in the functioning elderly. Rehovot, Israel: Geriatric Institute for Education and Research, and Department of Geriatrics, Kaplan Hospital, 1995.

    9. Jorissen BL, Brouns F, Van Boxtel MPJ, et al. The influence of soy-derived phosphatidylserine on cognition in age-associated memory impairment. Nutr Neurosci 2001;4:121-34.

    10. Maggioni M, Picotti GB, Bondiolotti GP, et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine therapy in geriatric patients with depressive disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1990;81(3):265-70.

    11. Cenacchi T, Bertoldin T, Farina C, et al. Cognitive decline in the elderly: a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study on efficacy of phosphatidylserine administration. Aging (Milano) 1993;5(2):123-33.

    12. Sakai M, Yamatoya H, Kudo S. Pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine enzymatically synthesized from soybean lecithin on brain functions in rodents. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1996;42:47-54.

    13. Kidd PM. Don't believe everything you read. . .a sequel. Point. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:122-4 [editorial].

    14. Gaby AR. Don't believe everything you read. CounterPoint. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:125-6 [editorial].

    15. Furushiro M, Suzuki S, Shishido Y, et al. Effects of oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on impaired learning of passive avoidance in mice. Jpn J Pharmacol 1997;75:447-50.

    16. Blokland A, Honig W, Brouns F, et al. Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutrition 1999;15:778-83.

    17. Gindin J, Novikov M, Kedar D, et al. The effect of plant phosphatidylserine on age-associated memory impairment and mood in the functioning elderly. Rehovot, Israel: Geriatric Institute for Education and Research, and Department of Geriatrics, Kaplan Hospital, 1995.

    18. Jorissen BL, Brouns F, Van Boxtel MPJ, et al. The influence of soy-derived phosphatidylserine on cognition in age-associated memory impairment. Nutr Neurosci 2001;4:121-34.

    Copyright © 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

    The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.

Images

Neuro-PS®  Gold

Vitamin World

Neuro-PS®  Gold

90 Softgels / Item# 017148
Buy 1, Get 1 Free
Add 2 items into the cart
Details
Add 2 items into the cart to receive the discount.

  • $79.49

    In Stock

Additional Information

Don’t worry if you can’t remember what the “PS” in Neuro-PS® stands for. 

And no, it does not mean “Postscript” as in “let me add something” – though Neuro-PS® is something you may want to add to your daily nutritional supplement routine. 

In this case, PS stands for Phosphatidylserine, a word everybody has trouble trying to remember, which is why we abbreviate it.  PS is a phospholipid, a natural substance found in brain cell membranes. It plays a role in neurotransmission, the transportation of nerve impulses across the synapses of the brain. These transmissions are essential to proper brain function, including mental cognition, memory and focus. 

Unfortunately, PS levels decline as a person ages, making supplementation a key way to support brain health.** Taking it might even help you remember what the “PS” stands for!** Especially because this special formula also includes Ginkgo Biloba – an herb that has been studied for its ability to support proper blood flow to the body’s extremities, especially the brain – as well as amino acids, the Ayurbedic herb Gotu Kola, and other nutrients.**

Supplement Facts

Serving Size 3 Softgels
Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories 25
Calories from Fat 15
Total Fat2 g 3%**
Total Carbohydrate<1 g <1%**
Protein<1 g 2%**
Neuro-PS® Gold™ Complex1,660.1 mg(1.66g) ***
  (Neuro-PS®) 1,500 mg (1.5g) ***
  (Phospholipid Complex from Soy (Lecithin)
  (Standardized to contain 20% (Phosphatidylserine, 300 mg) ***
  (DHA (from 44.7 mg Fish Oil) 10 mg ***
  (Ginkgo Biloba Extract (Ginkgo biloba) (leaf) 120 mg ***
  (Standardized to contain 24% Ginkgo (Flavone Glycosides, 28.8 mg) ***
  (Acetyl L-Carnitine Hydrochloride 10 mg ***
  (Gotu Kola Extract 6:1 10 mg ***
  (Centella asiatica) (leaf)
  (Choline Bitartrate 10 mg ***
  (Vinpocetine 100 mcg ***)
**Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
***Daily Value not established.
Directions: For adults, take three (3)softgels daily, preferably with a meal.

Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Vegetable Glycerin, Soybean Oil, Natural Caramel Color. Contains soy and fish (tuna)ingredients.

WARNING: If you are pregnant, nursing, taking any medications, including blood thinners, planning any medical or surgical procedure or have any medical condition, consult your doctor before use. Discontinue use and consult your doctor if any adverse reactions occur. Not intended for use by persons under the age of 18. Keep out of reach of children. Store at room temperature. Do not use if seal under cap is broken or missing.

Disclaimer

The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

Nutritional Supplement

Phosphatidylserine

This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Healthy Aging/Senior Health

    Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    Bovine-derived PS (phosphatidylserine) has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly. To date, most evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not effective for ARCD.
    Age-Related Cognitive Decline
    ×
     

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) derived from bovine brain phospholipids has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly in at least two placebo-controlled trials. In both trials, geriatric patients received 300 mg per day of PS or placebo. In an unblinded trial of ten elderly women with depressive disorders, supplementation with PS produced consistent improvement in depressive symptoms, memory, and behavior after 30 days of treatment.1 A double-blind trial of 494 geriatric patients with cognitive impairment found that 300 mg per day of PS produced significant improvements in behavioral and cognitive parameters after three months and again after six months.2

    Most research has been conducted with PS derived from bovine tissue, but what is available commercially is made from soy. The soy- and bovine-derived PS, however, are not structurally identical.3 Doctors and researchers have debated whether the structural differences could be important,4,5 but so far only a few trials have studied the effects of soy-based PS.

    Preliminary animal research shows that the soy-derived PS does have effects on brain function similar to effects from the bovine source.6,3,8 An isolated, unpublished double-blind human study used soy-derived PS in an evaluation of memory and mood benefits in nondemented, nondepressed elderly people with impaired memories and accompanying depression.9 In this three-month study, 300 mg per day of PS was not significantly more effective than a placebo. In a double-blind study, soy-derived PS was administered in the amount of 300 or 600 mg per day for 12 weeks to people with age-related memory impairment. Compared with the placebo, soy-derived PS had no effect on memory or on other measures of cognitive function.10 While additional research needs to be done, currently available evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not an effective treatment for age-related cognitive decline.

  • Brain Health

    Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    Bovine-derived PS (phosphatidylserine) has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly. To date, most evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not effective for ARCD.
    Age-Related Cognitive Decline
    ×
     

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) derived from bovine brain phospholipids has been shown to improve memory, cognition, and mood in the elderly in at least two placebo-controlled trials. In both trials, geriatric patients received 300 mg per day of PS or placebo. In an unblinded trial of ten elderly women with depressive disorders, supplementation with PS produced consistent improvement in depressive symptoms, memory, and behavior after 30 days of treatment.10 A double-blind trial of 494 geriatric patients with cognitive impairment found that 300 mg per day of PS produced significant improvements in behavioral and cognitive parameters after three months and again after six months.11

    Most research has been conducted with PS derived from bovine tissue, but what is available commercially is made from soy. The soy- and bovine-derived PS, however, are not structurally identical.12 Doctors and researchers have debated whether the structural differences could be important,13,14 but so far only a few trials have studied the effects of soy-based PS.

    Preliminary animal research shows that the soy-derived PS does have effects on brain function similar to effects from the bovine source.15,12,17 An isolated, unpublished double-blind human study used soy-derived PS in an evaluation of memory and mood benefits in nondemented, nondepressed elderly people with impaired memories and accompanying depression.18 In this three-month study, 300 mg per day of PS was not significantly more effective than a placebo. In a double-blind study, soy-derived PS was administered in the amount of 300 or 600 mg per day for 12 weeks to people with age-related memory impairment. Compared with the placebo, soy-derived PS had no effect on memory or on other measures of cognitive function.19 While additional research needs to be done, currently available evidence suggests that soy-derived PS is not an effective treatment for age-related cognitive decline.

What Are Star Ratings?
×
Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

Temp Title
×
Temp Text

Phosphatidylserine (PS) belongs to a special category of fat-soluble substances called phospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes. PS is found in high concentrations in the brain.

References

1. Maggioni M, Picotti GB, Bondiolotti GP, et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine therapy in geriatric patients with depressive disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1990;81(3):265-70.

2. Cenacchi T, Bertoldin T, Farina C, et al. Cognitive decline in the elderly: a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study on efficacy of phosphatidylserine administration. Aging (Milano) 1993;5(2):123-33.

3. Sakai M, Yamatoya H, Kudo S. Pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine enzymatically synthesized from soybean lecithin on brain functions in rodents. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1996;42:47-54.

4. Kidd PM. Don't believe everything you read. . .a sequel. Point. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:122-4 [editorial].

5. Gaby AR. Don't believe everything you read. CounterPoint. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:125-6 [editorial].

6. Furushiro M, Suzuki S, Shishido Y, et al. Effects of oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on impaired learning of passive avoidance in mice. Jpn J Pharmacol 1997;75:447-50.

7. Blokland A, Honig W, Brouns F, et al. Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutrition 1999;15:778-83.

8. Gindin J, Novikov M, Kedar D, et al. The effect of plant phosphatidylserine on age-associated memory impairment and mood in the functioning elderly. Rehovot, Israel: Geriatric Institute for Education and Research, and Department of Geriatrics, Kaplan Hospital, 1995.

9. Jorissen BL, Brouns F, Van Boxtel MPJ, et al. The influence of soy-derived phosphatidylserine on cognition in age-associated memory impairment. Nutr Neurosci 2001;4:121-34.

10. Maggioni M, Picotti GB, Bondiolotti GP, et al. Effects of phosphatidylserine therapy in geriatric patients with depressive disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1990;81(3):265-70.

11. Cenacchi T, Bertoldin T, Farina C, et al. Cognitive decline in the elderly: a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study on efficacy of phosphatidylserine administration. Aging (Milano) 1993;5(2):123-33.

12. Sakai M, Yamatoya H, Kudo S. Pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine enzymatically synthesized from soybean lecithin on brain functions in rodents. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1996;42:47-54.

13. Kidd PM. Don't believe everything you read. . .a sequel. Point. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:122-4 [editorial].

14. Gaby AR. Don't believe everything you read. CounterPoint. Townsend Letter for Doctors Patients 1997;July:125-6 [editorial].

15. Furushiro M, Suzuki S, Shishido Y, et al. Effects of oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on impaired learning of passive avoidance in mice. Jpn J Pharmacol 1997;75:447-50.

16. Blokland A, Honig W, Brouns F, et al. Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutrition 1999;15:778-83.

17. Gindin J, Novikov M, Kedar D, et al. The effect of plant phosphatidylserine on age-associated memory impairment and mood in the functioning elderly. Rehovot, Israel: Geriatric Institute for Education and Research, and Department of Geriatrics, Kaplan Hospital, 1995.

18. Jorissen BL, Brouns F, Van Boxtel MPJ, et al. The influence of soy-derived phosphatidylserine on cognition in age-associated memory impairment. Nutr Neurosci 2001;4:121-34.

Copyright © 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.