Organic Doctor

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner

Images

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner

Organic Doctor

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner

265 ml. Liquid / Item# 073523

  • $9.49 (21% off)
    Regular Price$11.99
    Price per ml. : $0.04

    In Stock

  • DESCRIPTION +

    From Manufacturer's Label:

    Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner - Purifying Hair Therapy

    Used in conjunction with our bioactive organic Tea Tree shampoo, this incredibly effective formulation naturally improves the condition of the hair by coating and penetrating the hair’s external fibers and cellular keratin matrix, allowing our bioactive Tea Tree complex to purify and invigorate the condition of the hair.

    Free from: • SLS • Parabens • Artificial colors • Phthalates • Harsh preservatives

    Organic* and Natural□ Bioactive ingredients:

    • Tea Tree Oil*
    • Aloe Vera Juice*
    • Shea Butter*
    • Vitamin E (and) Sunflower Seed Oil*
    • Apple Fruit Extract*
    • Peppermint Oil*

    Manufactured by: Dr Organic Ltd, Swansea UK
  • LABEL INFORMATION +
    Directions: Smooth conditioner through wet hair, leave as desired and rinse. For best results use with Organic Haircare Doctor Tea Tree Shampoo.

    Other Ingredients: Aloe barbadensis leaf juice, Water, Polyglyceryl-3 methylglucose distearate, Cetearyl alcohol, Glycerin, Pyrus malus (apple) fruit extract, Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) leaf oil, Butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter, Glyceryl caprylate, Panthenol, Guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, Mentha piperita (peppermint) oil, Tocopherol, Helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil, Sodium benzoate, Potassium sorbate, Sodium phytate.

    WARNING: Not for internal use. Avoid contact with eyes. Do not apply to broken or irritated skin. If sensitivity occurs discontinue use. Avoid this product if you are allergic or sensitive to any of the ingredients. Keep out of reach of children. Do not use on animals. Store in a cool dry place.
  • RATINGS & REVIEWS +
  • HEALTH NOTES +

    Disclaimer

    The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

    Nutritional Supplement

    Tea Tree

    This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
    • Skin Protection

      Acne Vulgaris

      Although tea tree oil is slower and less potent than benzoyl peroxide, it has been shown to improve acne with far fewer side effects.
      Acne Vulgaris
      ×

      A clinical trial compared the topical use of 5% tea tree oil to 5% benzoyl peroxide for common acne. Although the tea tree oil was slower and less potent in its action, it had far fewer side effects and was thus considered more effective overall.[REF] The effectiveness of tea tree oil was confirmed in a six-week double-blind trial. In that study, participants applied a 5% tea tree oil gel to the affected area twice a day for 20 minutes and then washed it off with tap water.1

    What Are Star Ratings?
    ×
    Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
    Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
    For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    Temp Title
    ×
    Temp Text

    How It Works

    The oil contains numerous chemicals known as terpenoids. Australian standards were established for the amount of one particular compound, terpinen-4-ol, which must make up at least 30% and preferably 40–50% of the oil for it to be medically useful. Another compound, cineole, should make up less than 15% and preferably 2.5% of the oil. The oil kills fungus and bacteria, including those resistant to some antibiotics.2,3 For common acne, a double-blind trial compared the topical use of 5% tea tree oil to 5% benzoyl peroxide.4 Although the tea tree oil was slower and less potent in its action, it had far fewer side effects and was thus considered more effective overall.

    A double-blind trial found that a 10% tea tree oil cream was as effective as anti-fungal medicine at improving symptoms associated with athlete’s foot, though it was not more effective than a placebo for eliminating the fungal infection.5 A double-blind trial found 100% tea tree oil applied topically was as effective as the anti-fungal medicine clotrimazole (Lotrimin®, Mycelex®) for people with fungus affecting the toe nails, a condition known as onychomycosis.6 In another double-blind trial with toenail fungus sufferers, a combination of 5% tea tree oil and 2% butenafine (Mentax®), a synthetic anti-fungal drug, in a cream proved more effective than an unspecified concentration of tea tree oil in cream alone.7 The results are not entirely surprising, as the tea tree product alone was probably not at a sufficiently high enough concentration to be effective.

    A preliminary trial found that rinsing the mouth with 1 tablespoon (15 ml) tea tree oil solution four times daily effectively treated thrush (oral yeast infections) in AIDS patients.8 Solutions containing no more than 5% should be used orally and should never be swallowed.

    A concern for hospital staff and patients is the spread of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus—sometimes referred to as a “staph infection.” One small clinical trial found that use of a 4% tea tree oil nasal ointment as well as a 5% tea tree oil body wash was slightly more effective than standard drugs used to prevent the spread of the bacteria.9

    References

    1. Enshaieh S, Jooya A, Siadat AH, Iraji F. The efficacy of 5% topical tea tree oil gel in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2007;73:22-5.

    2. Carson CF, Riley TV. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia: A review. Lett Appl Microbiol 1993;16:49-55.

    3. Carson CF, Cookson BD, Farrelly HD, Riley T. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. J Antimicrobial Chemother 1995;35:421-4.

    4. Bassett IB, Pannowitz DL, Barnetson RS. A comparative study of tea-tree oil versus benzoylperoxide in the treatment of acne. Med J Austral 1990;153:455-8.

    5. Tong MM, Altman PM, Barnetson RS. Tea tree oil in the treatment of tinea pedis. Austral J Dermatol 1992;33:145-9.

    6. Buck DS, Nidorf DM, Addino JG. Comparison of two topical preparations for the treatment of onychomycosis: Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and clotrimazole. J Fam Pract 1994;38:601-5.

    7. Syed TA, Qureshi ZA, Ali SM, et al. Treatment of toenail onychomycosis with 2% butenafine and 5% Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in cream. Trop Med Intl Health 1999;4:284-7.

    8. Jandourek A, Vaishampayan JK, Vazquez JA. Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole refractory oral candidiasis in AIDS patients. AIDS 1998;12:1033-7.

    9. Caelli M, Porteous J, Carson CF, et al. Tea tree oil as an alternative topical decolonization agent for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Hospital Infect 2000;46:236-7.

    Copyright © 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

    The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.

Images

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner

Organic Doctor

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner

265 ml. Liquid / Item# 073523

  • $9.49 (21% off)
    Regular Price$11.99
    Price per ml. : $0.04

    In Stock

Additional Information


From Manufacturer's Label:

Organic Doctor Tea Tree Conditioner - Purifying Hair Therapy

Used in conjunction with our bioactive organic Tea Tree shampoo, this incredibly effective formulation naturally improves the condition of the hair by coating and penetrating the hair’s external fibers and cellular keratin matrix, allowing our bioactive Tea Tree complex to purify and invigorate the condition of the hair.

Free from: • SLS • Parabens • Artificial colors • Phthalates • Harsh preservatives

Organic* and Natural□ Bioactive ingredients:

• Tea Tree Oil*
• Aloe Vera Juice*
• Shea Butter*
• Vitamin E (and) Sunflower Seed Oil*
• Apple Fruit Extract*
• Peppermint Oil*

Manufactured by: Dr Organic Ltd, Swansea UK
Directions: Smooth conditioner through wet hair, leave as desired and rinse. For best results use with Organic Haircare Doctor Tea Tree Shampoo.

Other Ingredients: Aloe barbadensis leaf juice, Water, Polyglyceryl-3 methylglucose distearate, Cetearyl alcohol, Glycerin, Pyrus malus (apple) fruit extract, Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) leaf oil, Butyrospermum parkii (shea) butter, Glyceryl caprylate, Panthenol, Guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride, Mentha piperita (peppermint) oil, Tocopherol, Helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil, Sodium benzoate, Potassium sorbate, Sodium phytate.

WARNING: Not for internal use. Avoid contact with eyes. Do not apply to broken or irritated skin. If sensitivity occurs discontinue use. Avoid this product if you are allergic or sensitive to any of the ingredients. Keep out of reach of children. Do not use on animals. Store in a cool dry place.

Disclaimer

The following information is third party literature provided by Aisle 7. Vitamin World does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of the content provided by Aisle 7. This content is not approved or recommended by us, does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and is not meant to replace professional medical advice or apply to any products. To continue to Aisle 7 please click Continue.

Nutritional Supplement

Tea Tree

This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Skin Protection

    Acne Vulgaris

    Although tea tree oil is slower and less potent than benzoyl peroxide, it has been shown to improve acne with far fewer side effects.
    Acne Vulgaris
    ×

    A clinical trial compared the topical use of 5% tea tree oil to 5% benzoyl peroxide for common acne. Although the tea tree oil was slower and less potent in its action, it had far fewer side effects and was thus considered more effective overall.[REF] The effectiveness of tea tree oil was confirmed in a six-week double-blind trial. In that study, participants applied a 5% tea tree oil gel to the affected area twice a day for 20 minutes and then washed it off with tap water.1

What Are Star Ratings?
×
Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

Temp Title
×
Temp Text

How It Works

The oil contains numerous chemicals known as terpenoids. Australian standards were established for the amount of one particular compound, terpinen-4-ol, which must make up at least 30% and preferably 40–50% of the oil for it to be medically useful. Another compound, cineole, should make up less than 15% and preferably 2.5% of the oil. The oil kills fungus and bacteria, including those resistant to some antibiotics.2,3 For common acne, a double-blind trial compared the topical use of 5% tea tree oil to 5% benzoyl peroxide.4 Although the tea tree oil was slower and less potent in its action, it had far fewer side effects and was thus considered more effective overall.

A double-blind trial found that a 10% tea tree oil cream was as effective as anti-fungal medicine at improving symptoms associated with athlete’s foot, though it was not more effective than a placebo for eliminating the fungal infection.5 A double-blind trial found 100% tea tree oil applied topically was as effective as the anti-fungal medicine clotrimazole (Lotrimin®, Mycelex®) for people with fungus affecting the toe nails, a condition known as onychomycosis.6 In another double-blind trial with toenail fungus sufferers, a combination of 5% tea tree oil and 2% butenafine (Mentax®), a synthetic anti-fungal drug, in a cream proved more effective than an unspecified concentration of tea tree oil in cream alone.7 The results are not entirely surprising, as the tea tree product alone was probably not at a sufficiently high enough concentration to be effective.

A preliminary trial found that rinsing the mouth with 1 tablespoon (15 ml) tea tree oil solution four times daily effectively treated thrush (oral yeast infections) in AIDS patients.8 Solutions containing no more than 5% should be used orally and should never be swallowed.

A concern for hospital staff and patients is the spread of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus—sometimes referred to as a “staph infection.” One small clinical trial found that use of a 4% tea tree oil nasal ointment as well as a 5% tea tree oil body wash was slightly more effective than standard drugs used to prevent the spread of the bacteria.9

References

1. Enshaieh S, Jooya A, Siadat AH, Iraji F. The efficacy of 5% topical tea tree oil gel in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2007;73:22-5.

2. Carson CF, Riley TV. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia: A review. Lett Appl Microbiol 1993;16:49-55.

3. Carson CF, Cookson BD, Farrelly HD, Riley T. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. J Antimicrobial Chemother 1995;35:421-4.

4. Bassett IB, Pannowitz DL, Barnetson RS. A comparative study of tea-tree oil versus benzoylperoxide in the treatment of acne. Med J Austral 1990;153:455-8.

5. Tong MM, Altman PM, Barnetson RS. Tea tree oil in the treatment of tinea pedis. Austral J Dermatol 1992;33:145-9.

6. Buck DS, Nidorf DM, Addino JG. Comparison of two topical preparations for the treatment of onychomycosis: Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and clotrimazole. J Fam Pract 1994;38:601-5.

7. Syed TA, Qureshi ZA, Ali SM, et al. Treatment of toenail onychomycosis with 2% butenafine and 5% Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in cream. Trop Med Intl Health 1999;4:284-7.

8. Jandourek A, Vaishampayan JK, Vazquez JA. Efficacy of melaleuca oral solution for the treatment of fluconazole refractory oral candidiasis in AIDS patients. AIDS 1998;12:1033-7.

9. Caelli M, Porteous J, Carson CF, et al. Tea tree oil as an alternative topical decolonization agent for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. J Hospital Infect 2000;46:236-7.

Copyright © 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.